Draft
 

 

 

 


Baseline Documentation

for the NE º of Section 3 excluding

the South 10 Chains of west 10 chains

Conservation Covenant

Cortes Island

 

 

 

 

submitted by

 

 

Kevin Haberl and Bob Green

B.A. Blackwell and Associates Ltd.

3057 Hoskins Road

North Vancouver, B.C.

V7J 3B5

 

Ken MacKenzie

Iverson and MacKenzie Biological Consulting Ltd.

P.O. Box 511

Lac La Hache, B.C.

V0K 1T0

 

 

 

March 6, 2003

 




I.               Acknowledgement of Condition

 

Donor:                        Weyerhaeuser Company Limited

Covenant Area:         the entire parcel listed below:

Parcel Identifier

Legal Description

000-913-961

NE º Section 3 Excluding S10Ch of W10Ch, Sayward District

which is shown outlined in heavy (red) line on the plan attached hereto at Exhibit A as Map 1 (the “Property”).

The Donor and Donee agree that the state of the Property as at the date of completion of the field observations for this report, being November 13, 2002, was as detailed in this report.

Donor:           

Weyerhaeuser Company Limited

 

Per:

 

Date:

 

 

Authorized Signatory

 

 

Donee:

The Nature Trust of British Columbia

 

Per:

 

Date:

 

 

Don Lane, Administrative Director

 

 

 

The undersigned acknowledge having prepared this report and hereby confirm that the attached information provides an accurate representation of the Property on November 13, 2002.

 

By: ____________________________________    Date: ____________________

                        Kevin Haberl, R.P.F.

 

 

By: ____________________________________    Date: ____________________

                        Ken MacKenzie, R.P.Bio


TABLE OF CONTENTS

I.    Acknowledgement of Condition.......................................................................................... 2

II.        Summary Information....................................................................................................... 5

A.  Property Information........................................................................................................ 5

1. Donor: Weyerhaeuser Company Limited........................................................................ 5

2. Location: E of Smelt Bay, Cortes Island........................................................................ 5

3. Easements or existing Rights-of-Way of Record: Sutil Point Road Right of Way, Smelt Bay Road Right of Way, Highfield Road Right of Way, Seascape Road Right of Way, Hydro/Telephone lines within road Rights of Way........................... 5

B.  Introduction....................................................................................................................... 5

C.  Methods.............................................................................................................................. 5

III.       Ecosystem Characteristics............................................................................................ 6

A.  Overview............................................................................................................................. 6

B.  Ecosystem description....................................................................................................... 6

C.  Soil Erosion Risk.............................................................................................................. 8

D.  Rare Plant Species And Plant Communities................................................................. 8

IV.       Wildlife Characteristics............................................................................................... 8

A.  Overview:........................................................................................................................... 8

B.  Wildlife Trees.................................................................................................................... 9

C.  Habitat Description........................................................................................................... 9

V.        Human-Engineered Features......................................................................................... 10

A.  Roads................................................................................................................................. 10

1. Smelt Bay Road............................................................................................................. 11

2. Sutil Point Road............................................................................................................. 11

3. Highfield Road............................................................................................................... 11

4. Seascape Road............................................................................................................... 11

5. Six old loose surface private access roads as mapped in Exhibit A............................... 11

B.  Bridges.............................................................................................................................. 11

C.  Hydro Lines...................................................................................................................... 11

VI.       Key Attributes................................................................................................................ 11

A.  Synopsis........................................................................................................................... 11

1. Ecologically significant habitat...................................................................................... 11

2. Rare plant species.......................................................................................................... 11

3. Rare wildlife species...................................................................................................... 11

4. Watercourses................................................................................................................. 11

5. Wetlands........................................................................................................................ 12

6. Wildlife trees.................................................................................................................. 12

B.  Wildlife Tree Management - Background................................................................... 12

VII.      Photographs: On-site and Aerial................................................................................ 12

VIII.    Maps.................................................................................................................................. 13

IX.       Recommended Monitoring............................................................................................. 13

X.        Caveat.............................................................................................................................. 13

XI.       References....................................................................................................................... 13

EXHIBIT "A" Maps..................................................................................................................... 15

EXHIBIT "B" Vegetation List................................................................................................. 20

EXHIBIT "C" Aerial Photograph........................................................................................... 21

EXHIBIT "D" Photographic Documentation........................................................................ 22

 


II.             Summary Information

A.             Property Information

1.              Donor: Weyerhaeuser Company Limited

2.              Location: E of Smelt Bay, Cortes Island.

3.              Easements or existing Rights-of-Way of Record: Sutil Point Road Right of Way, Smelt Bay Road Right of Way, Highfield Road Right of Way, Seascape Road Right of Way, Hydro/Telephone lines within road Rights of Way.

B.             Introduction

This baseline report documents the condition of the Property, including description of ecosystem characteristics, wildlife characteristics, and human-engineered features such as roads and power-lines. In addition, key attributes that are significant for land management and development are described. This includes ecologically significant habitats, rare plant species, rare wildlife species, watercourses, wetlands, and wildlife trees. The baseline report describes conditions of the Property as of November 13, 2002.

C.            Methods

The ecosystem, wildlife, and human-engineered features of the Property were assessed for the purposes of this report during a site visit conducted November 12 and 13, 2002. This visit was done by Kevin Haberl of B.A. Blackwell and Associates Ltd., North Vancouver, B.C., and by Ken MacKenzie of Iverson and MacKenzie Biological Consulting Ltd., Lac la Hache, B.C.

Prior to field visits, aerial photographs were viewed and areas with high potential for significant habitats were noted. All existing maps and a wildlife observation database (Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection) were reviewed. In addition, lists of rare plant and animal species[1], rare plant communities[2], and a database of local element occurrences (Ministry of Sustainable Resource Management) were reviewed. Any waterbodies, wetlands, rocky areas or natural open areas were noted and planned for viewing. The Property was thoroughly traversed on foot and any habitat features seen were noted. Any permanent habitat features including caves, cliffs, wetlands, and open water bodies were mapped and habitat quality for each of the evaluated species was rated.

Wildlife trees were evaluated during the field evaluation and mapped into areas of relatively consistent densities.

Ecosystem features including vegetation and soils were observed while traversing the Property on foot, and through data collected from twenty-four ecosystem assessment plots. These plots were a combination of full reconnaissance-level plots (KH plots) and quicker soil and vegetative description plots (K plots). The information gathered from the plots included data on physiography, soils (through excavation of a soil pit), understory vegetation and overstory tree species (modified from B.C. Min. of Env., Lands, and Parks, and B.C. Min. For. 1998). See Map 1 at Exhibit A for the traverse route and plot locations.

Selected features of the Property were photographed and are documented in the Photographic Documentation in Exhibit D.

III.           Ecosystem Characteristics

A.             Overview

The Property is a generally square shape bounded on the north side by an open canopy commercially thinned young forest, on the south by Smelt Bay Road, Sutil Point Road, and Highfield Road, on the west by private property, and on the east by private lots on Sutil Point Road or closed canopy young forest. The topography is uniform, even, and generally flat to rolling, and ranges in elevation from a low of 35m in the southeast to a high of 70m along the north edge. Soils were observed in roadcuts and at soil pits at many plot locations. The soil parent materials are predominantly deep glaciofluvial outwash, occasionally with a glaciomarine cap overlaying coarser materials. These soils are deep, coarse textured and rapidly drained except where impermeable layers occur and drainage is restricted. Root zone soil textures varied from LS (loamy sand) to S (sand) with coarse fragment content varying from 20 to 50%. The forest cover is dominated by commercially thinned second-growth Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and western redcedar (Thuja plicata) with small components of red alder (Alnus rubra), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla). The majority of the forest was established following logging in the 1930’s. There are approximately 13 small patchcuts throughout the property (see Map 4, Wildlife Polygons).

B.             Ecosystem description[3]

This area falls within the Eastern Very Dry Maritime Coastal Western Hemlock biogeoclimatic variant (CWHxm1). The Property has been divided into four different ecosystem polygons. An ecosystem polygon represents an area featuring a characteristic structural stage (Table 1) and ecosystem or pattern of ecosystems. Ecosystems are identified using site series recognized in the biogeoclimatic ecosystem classification system. Refer to Map 2 for location of the recognized ecosystem polygons.

TABLE 1. Forest structural stage classes

Code

Class

Description

NV

Non-vegetated

< 10% cover of vascular plants

HB

Herb

herb dominated communities, < 10% tree cover, < 25% shrub cover

SH

Shrub/herb

< 20 year old forest, dominated by shrubs <10 m tall including conifer regen, tree cover < 10%, < 20 years

PS

Pole/sapling

trees > 10 m tall and overtopping shrub and herb layer, generally 20 to 40 years

YF

Young forest

self-thinning evident, canopy layers developed, generally 40 to 80 years

MF

Mature forest

co-dominant trees mature, well developed understory often including advanced regen, generally 80-250 years

OF

Old forest

old, structurally complex stands with snags and CWD, generally >250 years

Ecosystem Polygon 1 is predominantly site series 03 (FdHw – Salal site series, moderately dry/nutrient poor) with a component of poorer site series 01 (HwFd – Kindbergia site series, slightly dry/nutrient poor). The soils are coarse sand on top of deep, coarse glaciofluvial outwash. The overstory is a generally Young Forest structural stage dominated by Douglas-fir (Fd) with a component of lodgepole pine (Pl). The overstory tree density is approximately 150 stems per hectare following the commercial thinning. This polygon is located in two separate units adjacent to the small property in the southwest corner of this property.

Ecosystem Polygon 2 is predominantly site series 01 (HwFd – Kindbergia site series, slightly dry-fresh/nutrient poor-medium) with a small component of site series 06 (HwCw-Deer fern site series, moist/nutrient poor-medium) and site series 03. The soils consist of a loamy sand to sand, coarse glaciofluvial outwash, with a rare glaciomarine cap of sand in a portion of the area. This polygon generally slopes gently to the south or southeast. There is a healthy and continuous cover of salal within this polygon, particularly in thinned areas. The stand is a predominately commercially thinned Young Forest structural stage comprised of Fd with a small component of western hemlock (Hw), and western redcedar (Cw), with small portions of unthinned young forest scattered within the polygon.

Ecosystem Polygon 3 is predominantly site series 06 with a component of site series 01. The soil consists of deep glaciofluvial outwash with a rare glaciomarine cap of sand in a portion of the area. This polygon has a moisture restricting layer, resulting in moist soils with mottling. This ecosystem polygon has a higher component of deciduous trees, particularly red alder (Dr), and supports moderate forest productivity. The overstory is a commercially thinned Young Forest structural stage comprised of Cw, Fd, and Dr.

Ecosystem Polygon 4 is predominantly site series 12 with some small sedge-dominated wet patches. The soil consists of deep glaciofluvial outwash with an organic cap in most of the area. This polygon has a moisture restricting layer, resulting in wet soils and scattered surface water. It is located in a broad hollow near the northeast corner of the property, and in a small depression in the southeast portion of the property. This ecosystem polygon has a higher component of deciduous trees, particularly red alder (Dr). The overstory is a commercially thinned Young Forest structural stage comprised of Cw, Hw and Dr.

C.            Soil Erosion Risk

Throughout the Property, soil parent materials are predominantly deep, coarse textured glaciofluvial outwash materials on subdued topography. No areas at significant risk of erosion were found on the Property.

D.            Rare Plant Species And Plant Communities

Rare species, which potentially may be found on Cortes Island, were selected from the species database maintained by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada[4] (COSEWIC). Species considered outside the range represented by the study area were excluded (e.g. high elevation alpine areas, Interior of B.C.).

Rare plant communities, which potentially may be found on Cortes Island, were obtained from the Conservation Data Center[5] (CDC) natural plant community tracking lists for the CWHxm1 biogeoclimatic variant.

No rare plant species were observed during the field examination, nor have been recorded in the CDC element occurrence reports. As vegetation was not fully developed due to the season, many of the listed species would not be visible. However, the ecosystems in which the majority of these species are typically found did not occur on the Property.

IV.           Wildlife Characteristics

A.             Overview:

Habitat requirements were divided into habitats used for reproduction, and general habitat used for the remainder of life history requisites. Generally, reproductive habitats are more restrictive to a species than the general habitat used for foraging or other life history requisites but often the quality of reproductive habitat depends upon proximity to and quality of adjacent foraging habitat.

Habitats for evaluation were separated into permanent habitat and temporary habitat attributes. Permanent habitats include such areas as cliffs, caves, streams, wetlands and lakes (Table 2). These features were mapped when encountered, described, areas of the habitat were estimated, and habitat value assigned. The overall habitat rating for these permanent habitats was then modified to reflect the quality of the surrounding foraging habitat.

Temporary habitat attributes include such things as forest structure and wildlife trees, and were described using structural stage (for forest structure) and density for Wildlife Tree Classes.

TABLE 2. List of permanent habitats associated with rare species potentially found on Cortes Island.

Habitat type

Designated species

 

Wetlands

northern red-legged frog

Caves/crevices

Keen’s long-eared myotis

Large Cliffs

Peregrine falcon

Open rangeland

Peregrine falcon

Streams/ Riparian Vegetation

Keen’s long-eared myotis, northern red-legged frog, barn owl, sharp-tailed snake

Shallow open water

northern red-legged frog

B.             Wildlife Trees

Wildlife trees were classified based upon decay class and species as per the Wildlife Danger Tree Assessor’s Course Handbook (6th ed., 2000) (Table 3). Signs of use increase quality rating, as does both tree height and diameter. Western redcedar (Thuja plicata) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) were rated as the most valuable wildlife tree species because of the longevity of standing dead trees of these species. Any sign of use was noted during field assessments. High value wildlife trees are defined as Wildlife Tree Classes 3, 4, 5 and, if there is sign of wildlife use (cavities, usually meaning that part of the tree is dead) Wildlife Tree Class 2. Wildlife Tree Class 6 and 7 trees and, if there is no visible wildlife use, Wildlife Tree Class 2 trees are of lower value. This rating is based both upon the expected longevity of the wildlife trees and on their current habitat value.

TABLE 3. Wildlife Tree Classes1

Class

 

Description

1

Live, healthy, no obvious decay

2

Live but unhealthy, internal decay evident, declining, deformed

3

Recently dead, wood sound, fine branches intact

4

Dead, wood relatively sound, fine branches fallen but larger limbs intact

5

Dead, wood becoming spongy, most limbs fallen, bark mostly intact

6

Dead, wood soft, limbs fallen, more than half the bark fallen, greater than 2/3 of tree height remaining erect

7

Dead, wood soft, most of bark sloughed, less than 2/3 of tree height erect

1 modified from Wildlife Danger Tree Assessor’s Course Handbook, 2000

C.            Habitat Description

Wildlife species and habitats evaluated on the Property were selected from the COSEWIC lists for British Columbia. Species on the lists that are not affected by land management practices (eg. whale species, sea otter) and species whose known distribution does not approach Cortes Island (eg. grizzly bear, Vancouver Island marmot) were deleted from the list of species to be evaluated. Habitat requirements for the remaining species were then obtained from the literature.

Most of the forests on the Property (Wildlife Polygon 1 on Map 4 in Exhibit A) has been recently commercially thinned with approximately 100 to 200 stems per hectare reserved. The small part east of Sutil Point Road had not been recently harvested and the forest here is much denser than in the remainder of the Property. This denser forest was differentiated from the remainder of the Property for this reason (Wildlife Polygon 2 on Map 4 in Exhibit A). High value wildlife trees and recruitment tree densities are generally low across the entire lot although more large recruitment trees were seen in Polygon 2.

No permanent habitat features were seen in the lot. The terrain is made up of glaciofluvial outwash and is fairly level and not suitable for burrowing. Occasional glacial erratic boulders were seen. No streams, wetlands, significant shallow open water, or rock cliffs were noted. Current habitat value for designated species is low. Few potential nest sites for cavity-nesting species were found in the lot and foraging habitat is limited.

 

TABLE 4. Summary of wildlife habitat features

Polygon

Permanent habitat (PH)

Value of PH

Structural stage (Table 1)

Density of high values wildlife trees (Table 5)

1 – thinned young forest

none

n/a

YF

1

2 – unthinned young forest

none

n/a

YF

1

 

TABLE 5. Density and distribution classes for wildlife tree assessment

Class

 

Distribution

1

a few sporadically occurring individuals

2

several sporadically occurring individuals

3

many uniformly distributed individuals

4

a single patch or clump

5

a few patches or clumps

6

several well-spaced patched or clumps

 

V.             Human-Engineered Features

A.             Roads

Smelt Bay Road is a paved all season public road located immediately to the south of this Property. Sutil Point Road enters the Property about midway along the east side and curves west within the property before leaving it to run west along the south boundary at the intersection with Highfield Road. This is also a paved all season public road. Highfield Road and Seascape Road are both public roads that go southeast and east respectively off of Sutil Point Road. Seascape Road is within the property for a short distance. Highfield Road runs along part of the south boundary.

Several private roads are located within the Property. Portions of these roads are very brushy. The private roads that are shown on the maps in Exhibit A are generally driveable and have a compact road bed. Sections of old access or logging roads can still be found, particularly related to the ground-based commercial thinning of this property, but provide no access and cannot now be considered roads. Access to these private roads is gated.

There is a small shallow gravel pit located on the south edge of the property just east of the Sutil Point Road/Smelt Bay Road junction. This pit is up to 2m deep and approximately 70m east/west and 40m north south in dimension.

The following summarizes the observed human engineered features:

 

1.              Smelt Bay Road

2.              Sutil Point Road

3.              Highfield Road

4.              Seascape Road

5.              Six old loose surface private access roads as mapped in Exhibit A.

6.              Gravel Pit on the south boundary

B.             Bridges

There are no bridges within the Property.

C.            Hydro Lines

There are power and telephone lines running the length of Sutil Point Road, Highfield Road, and Seascape Road within this property.

VI.           Key Attributes

A.             Synopsis

This section describes important features from the ecosystem and wildlife characteristics, which are relevant for land management and development.

1.              Ecologically significant habitat

There are no ecologically significant habitats within this property.

2.              Rare plant species

No rare plant species were found on the Property.

3.              Rare wildlife species

No rare wildlife species or their habitats were found on the Property.

4.              Watercourses

There are no watercourses on this property.

5.              Wetlands

No significant wetlands were seen on the Property. Ecosystem polygon 4 has some small wet patches that are too small to be classified as wetlands under the Forest Practices Code.

6.              Wildlife trees

The majority of this property has very low densities of wildlife trees and large veteran trees. The southeast portion of the property (Wildlife Polygon 2, east of Sutil Point Road) has a higher density of potential Wildlife Tree recruitment trees. This area should be managed to retain where possible large veteran trees that show signs of wildlife use.

B.             Wildlife Tree Management - Background

Wildlife trees are critical features for several of the wildlife species of interest. In addition, high value wildlife trees are one of the important attributes generally lacking throughout most second-growth forests that dominate the CWHxm1.

Wildlife trees are dynamic and can fall down or decay and become unsuitable for cavity nesting species. Predicting the time at which these changes will occur is difficult because of the many variables affecting wildlife tree longevity including tree size and species, storm events, lightning, moisture, wildlife feeding damage rate and type, species of decay fungi and other variables. By considering wildlife trees to be one aspect of stand structure and allowing for the recruitment of new standing dead trees over time, habitat values can be maintained.

The thinned forest found in wildlife polygon 1 (on Map # 4) of the Property will allow retained overstory trees to grow more quickly and reach a size where they will provide high quality wildlife tree habitat more quickly than in the unthinned parts of the Property. In more open grown conditions resulting from the stand thinning, the retained trees may also develop large crowns which also provide better habitat for a number of wildlife species. As wildlife trees are currently very infrequent on the Property, retention areas should be centered around concentrations of the retained overstory trees so that they may recruit into high quality wildlife trees over time.

A higher density of recruitment trees was found in wildlife polygon 2. A number of large western redcedar and Douglas-fir trees were seen in this polygon. Wildlife tree management emphasis is recommended for this polygon. Any large veteran trees in this polygon, particularly those showing sign of wildlife use, such as cavities or woodpecker feeding sign or large branches, forks or scars should be retained.

VII.         Photographs: On-site and Aerial

The photographic documentation was completed during the site visit conducted November 12 and 13, 2002, and is appended to this document in Exhibit D. In addition, an aerial photograph of the Property taken in 2001 is appended in Exhibit C.

The locations of the photographs are detailed on Map 3 with the numbers 1 to and including 9 thereon corresponding to the locations at which photographs were taken.

VIII.       Maps

The following four maps of the Property are attached to this report in Exhibit A:

Map 1: Traverse Route and Plot Location

Map 2: Ecosystem Polygons

Map 3: Photo Locations

Map 4: Wildlife Polygons

Disclaimer: Cartographic information including Property boundaries, road locations, power lines, streams, and contours from Weyerhaeuser Company Ltd. GIS databases, obtained through Olympic Resource Management, Vancouver, B.C. Polygon boundaries, plot locations, traverse routes, waterlines, and refined stream locations based on consultants field estimations. These are not surveyed locations.

IX.           Recommended Monitoring

This Property should be monitored for compliance with the Conservation Covenant once per year at a minimum.

X.             Caveat

To the extent that this document conflicts with the Conservation Covenant, the text of the fully executed Conservation Covenant shall control.

XI.           References

Banfield, A. W. 1974. The mammals of Canada. University of Toronto Press. 438 pp.

B.C. Conservation Data Centre. 2001. Tracking lists for the Campbell River, Sunshine Coast, and Mid Coast Forest Districts. B.C. Min. of Sustain. Res. Manage., Victoria.(http://srmwww.gov.bc.ca/cdc/tracking.htm).

B.C. Conservation Data Centre. 2001. Element occurrence database. BC Min. of Sustain. Res. Manage., Victoria.

B.C. Min. of Env., Lands, and Parks, and B.C. Min. For. 1998. Field manual for describing terrestrial ecosystems. Land Manage. Handbk. No. 25. Victoria, B.C.

Campbell, R.W., Neil K. Dawe, Ian McTaggart-Cowan, John M. Cooper, Gary W. Kaiser and Michael C. E. McNall. 1990. The birds of British Columbia Vol. 1. UBC Press, Vancouver, BC.

Campbell, R.W., Neil K. Dawe, Ian McTaggart-Cowan, John M. Cooper, Gary W. Kaiser and Michael C. E. McNall. 1990. The birds of British Columbia Vol. 2. UBC Press, Vancouver, BC.

Campbell, R.W., Neil K. Dawe, Ian McTaggart-Cowan, John M. Cooper, Gary W. Kaiser Michael C. E. McNall and G.E. John Smith. 1997. The birds of British Columbia Vol. 3. UBC Press, Vancouver, BC.

Campbell, R.W., Neil K. Dawe, Ian McTaggart-Cowan, John M. Cooper, Gary W. Kaiser, Andrew C. Stewart and Michael C. E. McNall. 2001. The birds of British Columbia Vol. 4. UBC Press, Vancouver, BC.

Cannings, Sydney G., Leah R. Ramsay, David F. Fraser, and Mark A. Fraker. 1999. Rare amphibians, reptiles, and mammals of British Columbia. Wildl. Branch and Resour. Inv. Branch, B.C. Ministr. Environ., Lands and Parks, Victoria, BC. 198 pp.

Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. 2002. Database of designated species. Gov. of Canada, Ottawa (http://www.cosewic.gc.ca/cosewic/eng/sct1/index_e.htm).

Fraser, David, F., William L. Harper, Sydney G. Cannings, and John M. Cooper. 1999. Rare birds of British Columbia.Wildl. Branch and Resour. Inv. Branch, BC Ministr. Environ., Lands and Parks, Victoria, BC. 244 pp.

Green, David M. and R. Wayne Campbell. 1984. The amphibians of British Columbia. Royal British Columbia Museum Handbook no. 45., Victoria, BC.

Green, R.N. and K. Klinka. 1994. A field guide to site identification and interpretation for the Vancouver Forest Region. B.C. Min. For., Land Management Handbook No. 28, Victoria, B.C.

Maser, Chris. 1998. Mammals of the Pacific Northwest. Oregon State University Press, Corvalis, OR.

Nagorsen, David W., 1996. Opposums, shrews and moles of British Columbia. UBC Press, Vancouver, BC. 169 pp.

Nagorsen, David, W. and R. Mark Brigham. 1993. Bats of British Columbia. UBC Press, Vancouver, BC.

Straley, G.B., R.L. Taylor & G.W. Douglas. 1985. The rare vascular plants of British Columbia. Syllogeus (Ottawa) No. 59: 1-165.

Wildlife Tree Committee of British Columbia. 2000. Wildlife danger tree assessor’s course Handbook. 6th Edition.


EXHIBIT "A"
Maps





EXHIBIT "B"
Vegetation List

Understory plant species observed in plot data

Scientific Name

Common Name

Alnus rubra

red alder

Anaphalis margaritacea

pearly everlasting

Cornus canadensis

bunchberry

Cytisus scoparius

Scotch broom

Dicranum fuscescens

dusky fork moss

Galium trifidum

small bedstraw

Galium triflorum

sweet-scented bedstraw

Gaultheria shallon

salal

Grass spp.

grass

Hieracium albiflorum

white-flowered hawkweed

Holodiscus discolor

oceanspray

Hylocomium splendens

step moss

Kindbergia oregana

Oregon beaked moss

Linnaea borealis

twinflower

Mahonia nervosa

dull Oregon-grape

Pinus contorta

lodgepole pine

Polystichum munitum

sword fern

Pseudotsuga menziesii

Douglas-fir

Pteridium aquilinum

bracken fern

Rosa gymnocarpa

baldhip rose

Rubus discolor

Himalayan blackberry

Rubus spectabilis

salmonberry

Rubus ursinus

trailing blackberry

Scapania bolanderi

yellow-ladle liverwort

Thuja plicata

western redcedar

Tsuga heterophylla

western hemlock

Vaccinium parvifolium

red huckleberry


 

EXHIBIT "C"
Aerial Photograph


 

EXHIBIT "D"
Photographic Documentation


 

Photo 1: Profile of the soil in the gravel pit on Sutil Point Road near the south end of the property. Coarse soils result in a dry site with low productivity Douglas-fir and salal.

Photo 2: Forest type around plot KH4, showing a small patchcut through a forest screen.

 

 

 

 

 

Photo 3: Old western redcedar near the NW corner of the property.

Photo 4: Thinned young forest near the NW corner of the property. Increased soil moisture is evident here with development of some deciduous shrubs in the understory community.

Photo 5: The northern portion of the property here is a broad gentle well-drained crest with a thinned young forest. This is a drier portion of ecosystem polygon 2.

Photo 6: Root profile from a windthrown tree in ecosystem polygon 2, near boundary with polygon 3. This profile shows a “flattened off” base indicating root restricting soil moisture at depth.

Photo 7: View of vegetation in ecological polygon 3. More western redcedar, red alder, ferns and shrubs are indicative of increasing soil moisture and nutrients. This site is nearly site series 07.

Photo 8: View of vegetation in a more zonal portion of ecological polygon 3 with a patchcut behind.

Photo 9: View of vegetation in ecological polygon 4. This small depression near Sutil Point Road is dominated by sedges but is not large enough to be an important habitat feature.

 

END OF DOCUMENT



[1] Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC)

[2] British Columbia Conservation Data Center (CDC)

[3] see Green and Klinka (1994) for a description of the biogeoclimatic ecosystem classification, biogeoclimatic variants, and site series

[4] COSEWIC develops and maintains a national listing of Canadian species at risk, using categories of extinct, extirpated, endangered, threatened, and vulnerable

[5] the CDC develops and maintains a provincial listing of plant communities, which have become most vulnerable. Red listed includes plant communities that are candidates for extirpated, endangered, or threatened status in B.C. Blue listed includes plant communities that are vulnerable in B.C.